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Coronavirus Scams / Cyber Security

Last updated October 7, 2021

Coronavirus Scams: Protect Yourself

Vaccine Card Scams

The Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG) and the FBI are advising the public to be aware of individuals selling fake COVID-19 vaccination record cards and encouraging others to print fake cards at home. Fake vaccination record cards have been advertised on social media websites, as well as e-commerce platforms and blogs.

Vaccination record cards are intended to provide recipients of the COVID-19 vaccine with information about the type of vaccine they received, and when they may be able to receive a second dose of the vaccine. If you did not receive the vaccine, do not buy fake vaccine cards, do not make your own vaccine cards, and do not fill in blank vaccination record cards with false information. By misrepresenting yourself as vaccinated when entering schools, mass transit, workplaces, gyms, or places of worship, you put yourself and others around you at risk of contracting COVID-19. Additionally, the unauthorized use of an official government agency’s seal (such as HHS or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)) is a crime and may be punishable under Title 18 United States Code, Section 1017, and other applicable laws.

Click here for more information: https://www.ic3.gov/Media/Y2021/PSA210330

 

 

FTC Guidelines on Coronavirus Scams

Scammers are taking advantage of the fear surrounding coronavirus.

Sellers have received warnings about selling unapproved or misbranded products claiming to treat or prevent the coronavirus. These products include teas, essential oils, and colloidal silver. The FTC says there is no evidence to back up these claims, and there are currently no approved vaccines, drugs, or investigational products currently available to treat or prevent the virus.

Additional Information to Avoid Coronavirus Scams:

  • Learn how to tell the difference between a real contact tracer and a scammer. Legitimate tracers need health information, not money or personal financial information.
  • Don’t respond to texts, emails or calls about checks from the government. Here’s what you need to know.
  • Ignore offers for vaccinations and home test kits. Scammers are selling products to treat or prevent COVID-19 without proof that they work.
  • Be wary of ads for test kits. Most test kits being advertised have not been approved by the FDA, and aren’t necessarily accurate.
  • Hang up on robocalls. Scammers are using illegal robocalls to pitch everything from low-priced health insurance to work-at-home schemes.
  • Watch for emails claiming to be from the CDC or WHO. Use sites like gov and usa.gov/coronavirus to get the latest information. And don’t click on links from sources you don’t know.
  • Do your homework when it comes to donations. Never donate in cash, by gift card, or by wiring money.
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